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Six of the Best 44: Painter Lorelei French Sowa

Manhattan Sky , oil on canvas, wax and gold leaf, 24 inches x 48 inches x 2 inches Part 43 of an interview series in which artists reply to the same six questions. Lorelei French Sowa is a painter located in Florida, USA. Her paintings, whether they refer to landscape, birds, or abstract patterns, are marked by a strong sense of shape, bold execution, and multilayered textures of paint or collage. You can see more of her work here . Philip Hartigan : What medium/media do you chiefly use, and why? Lorelei French Sowa : Paint is my primary medium, but within the scope of 2D, I vacillate between acrylics and oil. I love the problem-solving that 2D provides. The world is full of depth and shapes, and organizing that space on a flat panel and understanding the limitations and the possibilities of the medium paint requires intense creativity. The problem of how to depict something is an interesting one. There are a thousand and one ways you can go about it. There's no set rule. Philip Ha
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Joan Miro's Lithographs

 I was visiting Barcelona, Spain, between April 26 and May 5 --- my first return visit since I lived there in the mid-1990s. The occasion was for my wife, Patty, and I to celebrate our twentieth wedding anniversary. I could write many blog posts about this trip, from the waves of nostalgia that swept over me, the return to familiar haunts, the new things I saw and did with Patty as we created our own memories together (it was her first time in Barcelona).  For now, I'm considering the work I saw in the Joan Miro museum, and in particular his prints. I've never been much of a fan of Miro's work --- the whimsy often obscures the inventiveness for me --- but I remember being struck by the lithographs when I used to come to the museum a quarter of a century ago (free entry with my student ID). Seeing them again, I was still as taken with them as I was back then. The selection in the museum consists of about 40 framed prints, arrange in two groups of 20, installed on the walls s

Beverly Fisher and Studio Light Space

  Artist and designer Beverly Fisher has recently moved to Tucson, Arizona, from Philadelphia and she is working in a beautiful old adobe building in the Barrio Viejo. The space is a classic structure from the middle of the nineteenth century, with thick walls to keep the fierce summer heat at bay, and an interior of whitewashed walls and flagstone floors and a high ceiling with exposed beams and rafters. In addition to making her own work in the structure, Fisher exhibits work by herself and other artists in a space which seems tailor-made to display abstract work in the best possible environment. Beverly Fisher, A Passage Series , ink on paper on board, 20 ins. x 20 ins. x 2 ins. 2021 Fishers's work consists of ink drawings on paper. Their linearity implies a high degree of formal organization and an imposed structure, but on close inspection it's clear that the final image is arrived at by a process of exploration. In the piece picture above, what appears to be a grid is in

Six of the Best 43: Painter Leslie Peterson Sapp

Boudoir II , 40 inches x 48 inches, acrylic/charcoal/collage on panel, 2022 Part 43 of an interview series in which artists reply to the same six questions. Leslie Peterson Sapp is a painter and printmaker based in Oregon, USA. She makes painting and prints that call to mind mid-twentieth century magazine and book cover images, and film noir mystery. You can see more of her work here . Other interviews on this blog are available here. Philip Hartigan : What medium/media do you chiefly use, and why? Leslie Peterson Sapp: I use acrylic paint and paper. This is because I enjoy being able to collage paper and combine it with paint. Back in college I used oils, which are a far more sensual experience. But oil rots paper, and once I started working with collage and drawing, I switched. Now I am accustomed to the short drying time: it has a completely different rhythm than oil paint. PH : What piece are you currently working on? LSP : I’m working on a piece I’m calling “Boudoir”. It’s a larg

Six of the Best: Debra Disman

“ It's Not Black and White ”, (interior/open), Book board, mulberry paper, used typewriter ribbon, canvas, hemp cord, 2021 Part 42 of an interview series in which artists reply to the same six questions. Debra Disman makes sculptural objects from a combination of materials that can be read as fiber art, yet also imply book forms. Her work is  a mesmerising combination of materials, textures, and forms that are combined with exceptional skill. You can see more of her work  here . Other interviews on this blog are available  here . Philip Hartigan: What medium/media do you chiefly use, and why? Debra Disman : At the present time, I am working primarily in what you might call fiber: cloth/fabric/textiles/, including canvas, jute, lace and ribbon; and thread/string/cord, along with book board, paper, such as watercolor and mulberry papers; acrylic paint and adhesives. I interweave other materials such as used typewriter ribbon, varnish and plaster gauze into the works---whatever is nee

Six of the Best 41: Lisa Flowers Ross

Leaf Stack #43 , 2021, hand dyed fabrics, thread, 24” x 18” mounted on stretcher bars Part 41 of an interview series in which artists reply to the same six questions. Lisa Flowers Ross is an Idaho-based artist working with fabrics and other materials that she combines into pieces that emerge as semi-abstract recollections of natural forms, or as more formal abstract pieces. Lisa has been awarded several artist residencies including at Playa in Oregon, Brush Creek in Wyoming, Flathead Lake Biological Station (through Open AIR) in Montana, and in May 2022 she will spend a couple of weeks at the Holly House in Shelton, WA. In June 2022 her work will be shown in Baker City, Oregon, and in 2023 at the Visions Art Museum in San Diego. You can see more of her work  here . Other interviews on this blog are available  here . Philip Hartigan: What medium/media do you chiefly use, and why? Lisa Flowers Ross : Currently, my main medium is fabric. I started creating artworks with fabric in 2002. Be

Six of the Best 40: Michelle Hernandez

Chain of Events , encaustic monotype on Sumi-e paper Part 40 of an interview series in which artists reply to the same six questions. Michelle Hernandez, based in New Jersey, USA, works with encaustic to create monotypes and mixed media work that take full advantage of the rich range of mark making and depth of surface made possible by those materials. You can see more of her work here . Other interviews on this blog are available  here . Philip Hartigan: What medium/media do you chiefly use, and why? Michelle Hernandez : My primary medium is encaustic painting and encaustic monotype printing which I then turn into mixed-media collages (usually). I practiced as an interior and industrial designer for years and wanted to embark on a medium which really fed into my need for tactile manipulation. I’m a very hands-on person. As I researched different mediums, the encaustic process intrigued me; it’s a 4,000 year old medium once used by Romans and Egyptians in various forms. It’s a mash-up