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On a January Salon for writers, artists, and musicians

Patty and I held our latest Salon yesterday. 25 people - writers, artists, musicians, friends - came along to read from their fiction and non-fiction, play guitar and sing, and show pieces of art.



A description of Gertrude and Leo Stein's salon in early twentieth century Paris:

"On a typical Saturday evening, 60 years ago, one would have found Gertrude Stein at her post in the atelier, garbed in brown corduroy, sitting in a high-backed Renaissance chair, her legs dangling, next to the big cast-iron stove that heated the chilly room. A few feet away, one could hear Leo expounding to a group of visitors, his views on modern art. Among the crowd of Hungarian painters, French intellectuals, English aristocrats and German students, one might pick out the figures of Picasso and his mistress, Fernande Olivier (Picasso looking like an intense young bootblack; Fernande, almond-eyed and attractive). The man with the reddish beard and spectacles, looking like a German professor, would be Matisse. Next to him might be the poet Guillaume Apollinaire and his clinging friend, the painter Marie Laurencin. The tall figure would be that of Georges Braque, whose superior stature among the smaller cubists made him the official hanger- of-pictures in the atelier. In the American contingent, the familiars would be the painters Patrick Henry Bruce and Alfred Maurer, both of them early advocates of the modernist vision and both, at the same time, followers of Matisse. It was Alfred, as Gertrude recalled, who held up lighted matches so visitors could see that the CĂ©zannes were, indeed, finished paintings because they were framed." James R. Mellow, writing in the New York Times.

Comments

  1. I was there. It was great. In the Chicago contingent, the familiars would be the artists Deborah Doering, and Philip Hartigan, the jewelry creator Glenn Doering, the writers Greg, Jon, Cynthia, Gail, Jana, Nami, Eric, Gina, Patty, Jessi, Geoff, Tina, musicians Ted, Geoff, and Philip, and in the audience more writers and artists and lovers of the work.

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  2. As Walter once said the Catherine in the presence of Roger and Virginia, "I was there, too." It was a great time. Thanks very much you two. I enjoyed the readers and the discussions between pieces as well as the snacks and good company. Delightful.

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