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Six of the Best, Part 21: Andrew Crane

Part 21 of an interview series in which I invite artists to respond to six questions about art, process, and creativity  (previous interviews: 123456789101112, 13, 141516171819, 20).  The subject this time is painter Andrew Crane, whose work I've been enjoying via Google Plus for a while now. His paintings have echoes of the mark-making of Antoni Tapies, while still recognizably part of Andrew's own visual language. He lives in Northumberland, in the UK, which coincidentally is where I was born.

4e6 - Red step paint and graphite on hemp paper, 420 x 297mm
Philip Hartigan: What medium do you chiefly use, and why? 

Andrew Crane: Mmmm…tricky question. I'm a bit gregarious when it comes to media, especially if there's a hardware store nearby. Right now I'm using varnish with step paint on hemp paper - last week it was tile cement on panel. I love to experiment with the 'untraditional' but oil paint and acrylics are never far from reach. 

Philip Hartigan: What piece are you currently working on? 

Andrew Crane: I'm working my way through 250 sheets of A3 hemp paper at the moment. These pieces can take a couple of days or less than an hour. The process is quite spontaneous but more than likely some numbers or letters will show up. 

Explaining the Tao - oil with varnish on hemp paper, 420 x 297 mm
Philip Hartigan: What creative surprises are happening in the current work? 

Andrew Crane: With this current series I've been learning to trust my intuition - it feels very expansive. Also, I'm embracing 'ugly' marks and keeping the 'darlings' to a minimum. As a result, the work feels more authentic - closer to the core. Perhaps this is old-age - a devil-may-care attitude. Whatever it is, it feels liberating! 

Philip Hartigan: What other artistic medium (or non-artistic activity) feeds your creative process? 

Andrew Crane: When I'm painting I find Gershwin and Bach equally sparky. J.S. Bach nurtures my love of mathematics and Gershwin, my romantic side. Sometimes I may have some spiritual discourse playing in the background. The Gospel of Thomas is a favourite. Don't get me wrong though, I'm not into religion - it's more a combined process of uncovering who or what I am. Or if, indeed, I am at all! 

Manuscript - cement, varnish and house paint on canvas,122 x 183 cm
Philip Hartigan: What's the first ever piece of art you remember making? 

Andrew Crane: My dad was very good at drawing - he would sit me on his knee and say 'What shall we draw?' Now, even at that age, I had an idea of what might be tricky. 'How about a donkey playing cricket?' Sure enough, he gave me a donkey, hitting a glorious cover drive. Drawing for me came harder. I struggled (still struggle) with representational drawing from memory but I remember during one family outing being quite pleased with my riverbank sketch: the trees were quite believable. 

Philip Hartigan: Finally, and you can answer this in any way that's meaningful to you: why are you an artist

Andrew Crane: I think 'I Am', therefore I'm an artist.

If you liked this interview, and you'd like to keep up to date with the series, why not Subscribe, or sign-up via Google Connect, using one of the options over on the right? Thanks, and keep creating.

Comments

  1. Im sorry that's not art it paint spills on paper or whatever the fuck its on. My brothers name is andrew crane ands he is sixteen and is actually a talented artist unlike you

    ReplyDelete

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