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Day 35: Collating pages of the accordion book


On a brief visit to the studio, I added more layers of goo to some panels, and then collated the signatures of the 100 page accordion book that I'm working on. Shown above are the first 50 pages. I will have to separate it roughly in the middle and reattach them, because as you can see they're slightly out of line, when they should form an even column when closed.

This was the first moment, too, when I got a sense of how big a box I will need to make to house the book. I'm thinking of a clamshell box, about six inches by four inches, and about six inches deep.

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Comments

  1. This is definitely amazing. I am really drawn to the contrast between the black and white and also its vividness. It makes the feeling of the photographs look like something done by the machine in Kafka's "Penal Colony" which is remarkable. It's definitely the stipples that draws my attention and I would love to view this when it is completed.

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  2. Dear Halucigens,

    Thanks so much for the comment! The stippling comes from taking the images, which are 'found' images from the internet, and enlarging them on a photocopier by as much as 1000%. I like the distortion that occurs, when the edges of the image start to break down, but you can still see what it is. Are you a printmaker, by any chance?

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  3. No I have never tried printmaking and I don't really get it. I've had some friends explain it to me but I got to do it before I truly understand it. Conceptually, this art book has tons of references to modernity. Enlarging and distorting and also the black and white.

    ReplyDelete
  4. You can see a lot more of these over at the blog I'm keeping specifically for that project:

    http://thelucerneproject.blogspot.com

    Thanks again for your interest, Ms/Mr Halucigens.

    ReplyDelete

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